ACERVO

Publicaciones: Indonesia

Avances y perspectivas del manejo forestal para uso múltiple en el trópico húmedo

Tipo de acervo:

Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Esta edición presenta una contribución actualizada que pretende ampliar el conocimiento acerca de algunos factores que favorecen u obstaculizan el desarrollo de enfoques más integrales en los bosques tropicales de producción. Algunos mensajes clave contenidos en los diferentes artículos se destacan a continuación.

 

Autores: Guariguata, Manuel R.

Mexico’s community forest enterprises provide a proven pathway to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The global attention now being directed towards REDD+ as a strategy for combating carbon emissions due to deforestation and forest degradation is focused on increasing the value of forests through carbon markets. This is crucial and must be pursued. However, forest carbon markets are still incipient and await the conclusion of global climate accords before they can flourish. The Mexican experience demonstrates that the same goals—reduction of deforestation and forest degradation, expansion of forest cover, conservation of forest and biodiversity—can be achieved through CFEs, particularly for commercial timber production. CFEs also generate thousands of jobs for local communities, something that PAs have generally not been able to do. The potential of Mexican community forestry to contribute to climate change mitigation has been recognised for some time (Klooster and Masera 2000). A comprehensive study of the potential for carbon sequestration by different land uses in Mexico found that the ‘most cost-effective method for sequestering carbon appears to be the improved management of natural forest on communal lands’ (De Jong et al.2000). If REDD+ can develop mechanisms to encourage the successful existing models of climate change mitigation and adaptation seen in CFEs, this will indeed be a ‘plus’.

 

Autores: Barton Bray, David

Realising REDD+, National Strategy and policy options

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Putting this book together has – at times – felt as challenging as realising REDD+itself, with challenges in both horizontal and vertical coordination. The only reason it has succeeded is the dedication of more than 100 people who have contributed to the book as authors, reviewers and members of the production team.
This book is an early output of a Global Comparative Study on REDD, coordinated by CIFOR and involving a number of partner organisations and individuals. The ideas and format of the book emerged through discussions within this project. Coeditors Maria Brockhaus, Markku Kanninen, Erin Sills, William D. Sunderlin and Sheila Wertz-Kanounnikoff, have given valuable input all along.
The book is the collective output of 59 authors of chapters and boxes. Insofar as this book will become useful in realising REDD+it will be because of the quality of the chapters. The cooperation with authors has been a pleasure: Everyone responded with alacrity to very tight deadlines and requests for revisions from reviewers and editors.
Therese Dokken has been a very able editorial assistant during this process, keeping track of the 100+reviews, 150+chapter drafts, 553 references, and supporting materials. At CIFOR in Bogor, Indonesia, Edith Johnson has been the managing editor, organising language and copy editing and keeping an eye on the overall process until the final product. Gideon Suharyanto took the lead in ensuring the book meets CIFOR’s high printing standards. Production staff also included Benoit Lecomte, Vidya Fitrian, Daniel Rahadian and Catur Wahyu. Among the many individuals that have contributed, Therese, Edith and Gideon deserve the podium positions in terms of (late) hours invested and commitment.
All chapters were thoroughly edited by Sandra Child, Rodney Lynn, Imogen Badgery-Parker, Guy Manners and Edith Johnson.
In addition to the chapter authors, a number of people responded to our initial survey of key issues and challenges in REDD+implementation or reviewed one or more chapters: Jan Abrahamsen, André Aquino, Odd Arnesen, Juergen Blaser, Ivan Bond, Benoit Bosquet, Timothy Boyle, Carol Colfer, Esteve Corbera, Andreas Dahl-Jørgensen, Michael Dutschke, Paul Ferraro, Denis Gautier, Terje Gobakken, Xavier Haro, Jonathan Haskett, Jeffrey Hatcher, Bente Herstad, John Hudson, William Hyde, Hans Olav Ibrekk, Said Iddi, Per Fredrik Pharo Ilsaas, Peter Aarup Iversen, Ivar Jørgensen, David Kaimowitz, Katia Karousakis, Alain Karsenty, Sjur Kasa, Omaliss Keo, Metta Kongphan-apirak , Liwei Lin, Henrik Lindhjem, Cyril Loisel, Asbjørn Løvbræk, William Magrath, Vincent Medjibe, Inger Næss, Jordan Oestreicher, Vemund Olsen, Pablo Pacheco, Steve Panfil, Ravi Prahbu, Claudia Romero, Jeffrey Sayer, Jolien Schure, Haddy J. Sey, Sheona Shackleton, Alexander Shenkin, Toby Janson-Smith, Tina Søreide, Andreas Tveteraas, Jerry Vanclay, Pål Vedeld, Joseph Veldman, Christina Voigt, Chunfeng Wang, Andy White, Reinhardt Wolf and Ragnar Øygard.
Funding for the production of the book has been provided by the Norwegian International Climate and Forest Initiative, through the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad). Additional funding for the Global Comparative Study on REDD is provided by the Australian Agency for International Development, the UK Department for International Development, the European Commission, the Department for International Development Cooperation of Finland, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Program on Forests, the US Agency for International Development and the US Department of Agriculture.
Bogor, Indonesia, and Ås, Norway
18 November 2009
Arild Angelsen

 

Autores: Angelsen, Arild

Compatibility of timber and non-timber forest product management in natural tropical forests: Perspectives, challenges, and opportunities

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Tropical forests could satisfy multiple demands for goods and services both for present and future generations. Yet integrated approaches to natural forest management remain elusive across the tropics. In this paper we examine one combination of uses: selective harvesting of timber and non-timber forest product (NTFP) extraction. We analyze the current status of this combination and speculate on prospects and challenges regarding: (i) resource inventory, (ii) ecology and silviculture, (iii) conflict in the use of multipurpose tree species, (iv) wildlife conservation and use, (v) tenure, and (vi) product certification. Our conclusions remain preliminary due to the relative paucity of published studies and lessons learned on what has worked and what has not in the context of integrated management for timber and NTFPs. We propose at least three ways where further research is merited. One, in improving ‘opportunistic’ situations driven by selective timber harvesting that also enhance NTFP values. Two, to explicitly enhance both timber and NTFP values through targeted management interventions. Three, to explicitly assess biophysical, social, regulatory and institutional aspects so that combined benefits are maximized. Interventions for enhancing the compatibility of timber and NTFP extraction must be scaled in relation to the size of the area being managed, applied timber harvesting intensities, and the dynamics of multi-actor, forest partnerships (e.g., between the private sector and local communities). In addition, training and education issues may have to be re-crafted with multiple-use management approaches inserted into tropical forestry curricula.

Autores: Manuel R. Guariguata, Carmen García Fernández, Douglas Sheil, Robert Nasi, Cristina Herrero-Jáuregui, Peter Cronkleton y Verina Ingram

Analysing REDD+. Challenges and choices

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

REDD+ is moving ahead, but at a slower pace and in a different form than we expected when it was launched at Bali in 2007. This book takes stock of REDD+ and asks a number of questions. How has REDD+ changed, and why? How is REDD+ unfolding in national policy arenas? What does REDD+ look like on the ground? What are the main challenges in designing and implementing REDD+? And, what are the  choices  that need to be made to enable REDD+ to become more effective, efficient and equitable?
Most of the analysis is based on a large comparative research project, the Global Comparative Study on REDD+ (GCS), undertaken by CIFOR and   partners.
REDD+ – as an idea – is a success story. REDD+ has been perceived as a quick and cheap option for taking early action toward limiting global warming to 2°C. It also takes a fresh approach to the forest and climate debate, with large-scale result-based funding as a key characteristic and the hope that transformational change will happen both in and beyond the forestry sector. At the same time, REDD+ has been sufficiently broad to serve as a canopy under which a wide range of actors can pursue their own ideas of what it ought to achieve.
REDD+ not only presents challenges but also choices, as is pointed out throughout the book. Uncertainty should not lead to inaction. Regardless of what happens to REDD+ as a global mechanism in the UNFCCC process, priority should be given to three sets of actions: i) building broad political support for REDD+, e.g. by coalition building and focusing on REDD+ as an objective; ii) laying the foundations for eventual REDD+ success, e.g. by investing in stronger information systems; and iii) implementing ‘no regrets’ policy reforms that can reduce deforestation and forest degradation but which are desirable regardless of climate objectives, e.g. removal of perverse and costly subsidies and strengthening tenure and governance.

 

Autores: Angelsen, Arild / Brockhaus, Maria / Sunderlin, William D. / Verchot, Louis V.

The Non-Legally Binding Instrument on All Types of Forests

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Forests in a changing environment

  • Forests and climate change
  • Reversing the loss of forest cover, preventing forest degradation in all types of forests and combating desertification, including in LFCCs
  • Forests and biodiversity conservation, including protected areas

Bosques y derechos comunitarios. Las reformas en la tenencia forestal

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías: , ,

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Existen varias razones, además de la conservación de los bosques y la biodiversidad, para estar preocupados por el estado de los bosques en el mundo, desde el alivio a la pobreza hasta la preservación de comunidades indígenas y el cambio climático. Sin embargo, hasta ahora se han hecho pocos intentos por resumir lo que ya se conoce acerca de los esfuerzos por otorgar nuevos derechos de tenencia a las comunidades que viven en los bosques o alrededor de ellos, lo que se conoce en la actualidad como la ‘reforma forestal’. Solo desde el 2002, 15 de los 30 países con más bosques en el mundo han aumentado el área forestal disponible para uso, manejo y propiedad de las comunidades locales. Los autores de Bosques y derechos comunitarios  argumentan que la conjunción de diversos  factores ha permitido que los derechos de estas comunidades sean  finalmente reconocidos. Figura entre las razones que explican esta tendencia global el creciente reconocimiento de que la conservación, sostenibilidad y mejores medios de vida para aquellos que tradicionalmente han dependido de los bosques pueden, en realidad, ser objetivos complementarios.

 

Autores:  M. Larson, Anne / Barry, Deborah / Ram Dahal, Ganga / Pierce Colfer, Carlo J.  (editores)

Rights to forests and carbon under REDD+ initiatives in Latin America

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Tenure rights over land, forest and carbon are of central concern to REDD+ strategies. Tenure rights shape access and decision making with regard to land and forest resources. Tropical forests, however, are often sites of conflict and competing claims to land and trees, and insecure forest tenure rights are associated with deforestation and degradation. Lowering carbon emissions and compensating those responsible under REDD+ initiatives will require clear and secure rights. This raises concerns for communities and indigenous peoples living in forests, who fear that REDD+ may lead to the usurpation of their rights by outsiders or to increased hardship due to new limitations on forest use.
Although the importance of these tenure issues is widely recognised, important gaps remain in the relevant literature and in country Readiness Preparation Proposals (R-PPs), particularly regarding the allocation of carbon rights and liabilities.
This brief is organised as follows. The first 2 sections discuss concepts of tenure and highlight progress and problems in the recognition or clarification of forest tenure in the Latin America region. The next section discusses community forestry management (CFM) as a potential REDD+ strategy. Following this is a discussion of indigenous territories specifically. The subsequent section presents the current status of country initiatives regarding rights, liabilities and benefit distribution. This is followed by a summary of the key lessons learnt and the conclusions.

 

Autores: Larson, Anne M. / Corbera, Esteve / Cronkleton, Peter / van Dam, Chris / Bray, David / Estrada, Manuel / May, Peter / Medina, Gabriel / Navarro, Guillermo / Pacheco, Pablo

Community Forest Management and the Emergence of Multi-Scale Governance Institutions: Lessons for REDD+ Develompent from Mexico, Brazil and Bolivia

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

One of the greatest challenges in designing REDD+ mechanisms will be determining what institutional design elements and implementation strategies will work best. In addition to current attention to international and national REDD architecture, there is a pressing need to focus on regional and local architecture, and to understand existing forest management strategies effective in stopping deforestation. Community forest management (CFM) is one proven strategy where collective action by local people can move beyond deforestation or degradation and achieve sustainable management, under certain conditions. Where successful, CFM is often associated with both secure rights to forest resources and the development of multi-scaled governance institutions. Such institutions provide the legal frameworks that allow local people to establish control over forest resources and develop local-level governance structures adequate for new management demands. These local governance institutions can develop when supported to do so in alliances with networks of national and international government and civil society organizations. By comparing cases where successful CFM has emerged it will be possible to illustrate some of the local, national, and international institutional characteristics necessary for the development of governance institutions capable of maintaining forests, resisting deforestation and degradation and generating additional benefits. Examining the conditions that have enabled CFM development could provide useful lessons for REDD+ implementation.
There is growing evidence that varying forms of CFM have reduced, or stopped, deforestation and even enhanced carbon stocks under specific circumstances, and has done so while achieving more equitable outcomes in the distribution of forest incomes and at a relatively low cost. The equitability and cost characteristics (and potential for joining development and conservation) makes CFM one REDD mechanism with great potential for adoption at the local level. A recent study found that the percentage of the global forest estate designated for use or owned by local communities and indigenous peoples went from 9.2% to 11.4% between 2002 and 2008 and an earlier study found that 22% of developing country forests are in this category. These numbers suggest a growing need to identify and maintain institutional frameworks to promote CFM. We argue that the global transition to CFM is central to achieving equity and the democratization of natural assets while avoiding deforestation and degradation.
CFM in its various forms is particularly advanced in Latin America, likely associated with the relative degree of democracy in the region, which provides a context in which local governance institutions emerge and build multi-level linkages and alliances with other actors and organizations. As we will describe, some forests managed by communities, for the commercial production of timber, and occasionally non-timber forest products (NTFPs), have achieved what could be called a post-REDD landscape, i.e., where local-level decision makers over forests benefit by maintaining them, producing well conserved forest landscapes. Latin American experiences with CFM illustrate the importance of providing secure rights over forest property to community level actors and establishing conditions conducive to the formation of multi-scale governance institutions capable of maintaining and adapting forest management systems. Governance has been defined as ?the traditions and institutions by which authority in a country is exercised? which suggests a focus on government and the relation between a government and its citizens. However, scholars of forest governance have focused on the role of community-level institutions, which may or may not be part of recognized political authority in a country, and/or a broader set of relations between community institutions and government and NGO actors. The concept of ?multi-scale governance? is used here to include all levels and geographic scales of national and international government authority, local community governance regimes, and civil society institutional partnerships or networks which have decision making power or influence over forest management. REDD+ faces a number of governance challenges. These include vertical and horizontal linkages between and among local communities, all levels of government, and civil society actors. There will be notable power asymmetries between many of these actors, and the processes will necessarily be turbulent, but government policy and international institutions can help strengthen the capacity of local communities to interact with other levels and develop multi-level collective action.
This paper analyses factors leading to the emergence of multi-scale governance institutions in CFM systems that successfully maintain forest landscapes drawing on cases from three Latin American countries: Mexico, which has a lengthy history of community management of forests and Brazil and Bolivia, two countries where innovative reforms have created conditions for nascent examples of CFM. A fourth relevant case, Guatemala, is not included for reasons of space. The further challenge for these experiences will be how to extend the model into areas of currently threatened forests.

 

Autores: Cronkleton, Peter / Barton Bray, David / Medina, Gabriel

Preventing the risk of corruption in REDD+ in Indonesia

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) is a mechanism designed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to enhance the role of forests in curbing climate change (UNFCCC 2007). The UNFCCC and its bodies have expanded the concept to include forest conservation and human activities that increase carbon stocks, or REDD+ (UNFCCC 2007, 2009). REDD+ has the potential to alter the incentives for deforestation and land use change and instead to encourage sustainable forest management.
Significant official development assistance (ODA) has already been committed to create the policy conditions for REDD+ and demonstration projects in forest-rich tropical countries, including Indonesia. The hope is that eventually ODA will be replaced by payments for reduced carbon emissions in a fully operational compliance market for forest carbon credits. In the meantime, investors are acquiring – and governments are designating – large land areas in preparation for a REDD+ regime.
Without binding international agreements under the UNFCCC in place, REDD+ is evolving as a voluntary, bilateral or multilateral mechanism. Unclear REDD+ rules, potential for significant financial gain and weak governance in many of the tropical countries involved are giving rise to suspicions that possible speculative processes, corruption and malpractices may proliferate. Such practices range from violation of forest–dependent people’s rights and livelihoods to increased deforestation and manipulation of baselines, carbon emissions reports and accounts. Even though Indonesia has demonstrated its commitment to improving governance and reducing corruption, concerns remain that old patterns and governance failures will be repeated in this new REDD+ context.
This paper aims to provide an analysis of the risk of corruption in REDD+ readiness activities, and the conditions that may influence potential outcomes in Indonesia. The intention is to inform, first and foremost, the government of Indonesia (GoI) and its efforts in building the policies and institutions for REDD+, so that adequate steps can be taken to remove barriers and reduce risks. As Indonesia is at the forefront in REDD+ policy reform and institutional design, it is hoped the analysis will also inform other forest-rich tropical countries and the donor community.
Given its purpose and scope, this paper pays significantly more attention to weaknesses that can affect REDD+ than to Indonesia’s progress in curbing corruption and other associated crimes in the forestry sector. It focuses on the readiness phase – when tropical countries are preparing for REDD+ implementation – because this is the period during which policies, institutions, systems and processes are designed. These will influence the presence or absence of risks and conditions for corruption in subsequent phases.
The paper is structured as follows. Section 2 summarises the GoI’s main undertakings in preparing the country for REDD+. Section 3 offers background information about Indonesia’s forests and governance, reviews the general risks of corruption in REDD+ and highlights efforts to curb corruption, including the involvement of banks in preventing money laundering. Section 4 identifies the risks of corruption in the REDD+ policymaking process, paying special attention to the planned moratorium aimed at reducing forest conversion and the efforts to close regulatory loopholes and data gaps. It discusses how these efforts will support forest land use policies and clarification of jurisdictions and rights over forests. Section 5 looks at progress and gaps in cross-agency coordination. Section 6 discusses experience in climate financing in Indonesia, experience in the management and distribution of funds, and the role of banks. Section 7 reviews REDD+ benefit sharing, with particular attention to the discussion on the Ministry of Forestry (MoF) regulation on revenue sharing from voluntary carbon markets and payments for environmental services. Section 8 discusses the REDD+ project implementation framework, focusing on experiences with licensing processes for forest concessions and permits, the types of concessions for forest use and REDD+ and the opportunities for corruption and their likely outcomes. Section 9 considers lessons from current practices in forest tax and production report reconciliation, the involvement of multiple agencies at various scales and the risks of corruption in REDD+. Section 10 summarises the main conclusions and provides some recommendations for priorities in addressing current weaknesses.
The paper is based on an analysis of relevant legislation, interviews with agency officials, literature reviews and media reports. Given the sensitivity of the topic, interviewees are not named. Their agency affiliation and the time of the interview are given instead. Research for this working paper drew extensively from print media, primarily in Indonesia but also globally, because REDD+ events are very recent and not all official documents are available. Many of the decisions and the processes discussed here are highly dynamic; by the time this paper is published, circumstances are likely to have changed.

 

Autores: Dermawan, Ahmad / Petkova, Elena / Sinaga, Anna / Muhajir, Mumu / Indriatmoko, Yayan

Nueva reglamentación alejará a empresas madereras de prácticas habituales

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Nuevas regulaciones prohibiendo la venta de madera ilegal en países consumidores obligará a las compañías a alejarse de las prácticas habituales de negocios, y forman parte de un doble enfoque para asegurar la sostenibilidad del abastecimiento de productos de madera.

Bajo una reglamentación que entrará en vigor en la Unión Europea el próximo año, las empresas tendrán que verificar la legalidad de la madera desde el país de origen, dijo Chen Hin Keong, Jefe del Programa Global de Comercio Forestal de TRAFFIC. Si bien el impacto de esta disposición sobre la tala ilegal no está claro, ya existen “ciertos desarrollos que uno puede ver en los mercados mundiales: las industrias quieren enterarse de las regulaciones,” dijo Chen.

 

Autores: Aurora, Leony

New timber regulation to force companies away from business-as-usual practices

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

New regulations banning sale of illegal timber in consumer countries will force companies to move away from business-as-usual practices, part of a two-pronged approach to ensure the sustainability of supply for wood products.

Under a regulation that will come into effect in the European Union next year, companies will have to verify the legality of timber from the harvest country onwards, said Chen Hin Keong, Global Forest Trade Programme Leader at TRAFFIC. While the impact of this rule on illegal logging is unclear, there are already “certain developments you can see in the global markets: industries want to learn about the regulations,” said Chen.

 

Autores: Aurora, Leony

Comunidades indígenas preparan una lista de “qué hacer y qué no hacer” en los esquemas de conservación de bosques

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías: , , ,

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Grupos y comunidades indígenas han hecho una lista de deseos detallando cómo deberían funcionar los esquemas que buscan reducir la deforestación y la degradación de los bosques para aquellos que viven en y de los bosques.

Las recomendaciones, formuladas en una reunión al margen de las recientes discusiones sobre el clima de las Naciones Unidas en Durban, son oportunas a la luz del debilitamiento de las salvaguardas sociales en el texto de REDD+ que se trabajó durante la cumbre.

 

Autores: Kovacevik, Michelle

Indigenous communities make a list of “do’s and don’ts” for forest conservation schemes

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías: ,

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Inndigenous and community groups have made a wish-list detalling how schemes that aim to reduce deforestation and forest degradation should work for those living in and amongst the forest.

The recommendations, formulated at a meeting on the sidelines of recent the UN climate talks in Durban are timely in the light of the watering down social safeguards in the REDD+ text decided upon at the summit.

 

Autores: Kovacevic, Michelle

Gobernanza forestal y REDD+; Desafíos para las políticas y mercados en América Latina

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías: , ,

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Gobernanza forestal, descentralización y REDD+ en América Latina

Los bosques y su gobernanza han sido objeto de creciente atención en los últimos años. Un factor que ha estimulado este interés es el reconocimiento del hecho que la deforestación contribuye de forma significativa a las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. Al respecto, se está diseñando el mecanismo emergente REDD+ (reducción de emisiones derivadas de la deforestación y degradación de los bosques) bajo la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (CMNUCC) con el objetivo de emplear incentivos financieros para mejorar el papel que juegan los bosques en aminorar el cambio climático.
Tal como lo definen la CMNUCC y su Plan de Acción de Bali, REDD+ se refiere a «los enfoques de política e incentivos positivos para las cuestiones relativas a la reducción de las emisiones derivadas de la deforestación y degradación de los bosques en los países en desarrollo, y la función de la conservación, la gestión sostenible de los bosques y el aumento de las reservas forestales de carbono en los países en desarrollo». El signo «más», añadido en 2009, indica un amplio acuerdo que establece que se debe incluir el aumento de las reservas de carbono en los mecanismos REDD.
Los bosques juegan un papel importante en los flujos globales de carbono, como sumideros y como fuentes de emisiones de carbono. Adicionalmente, conservan la fertilidad del suelo, contribuyen a proteger la calidad del agua, mantienen el equilibrio ecológico y preservan la mayor parte de la biodiversidad terrestre. Asimismo, apoyan directamente los medios de vida de más de 1.400 millones de personas pobres en el mundo. Para capturar estos valores y preservarlos, se espera que REDD+ proporcione beneficios colaterales como la conservación de la biodiversidad y el alivio a la pobreza.
A pesar de las vacilantes negociaciones en las conferencias de las partes de la CMNUCC, los acuerdos sobre REDD+ siguen avanzando, particularmente a través del Acuerdo de Colaboración Provisional sobre REDD+ (Interim REDD+ Partnership), un grupo compuesto por más de 60 donantes y países en desarrollo. Estos acuerdos suponen una promesa y un compromiso de flujos financieros para países en desarrollo, con importante superficie de bosques tropicales. Este financiamiento brindará la oportunidad de modificar las trayectorias actuales de desarrollo basadas en la extracción, el agotamiento y la sustitución de los bienes forestales, usualmente a expensas de derechos y medios de vida de poblaciones locales. No obstante, cambios en las trayectorias de desarrollo dependerá de reformas de la gobernanza que van mucho más allá del sector forestal, involucrando políticas macroeconómicas y sectoriales en sectores como la agricultura, las finanzas y el comercio.

No obstante, después del entusiasmo inicial por el potencial de REDD+, ha crecido la preocupación por la efectividad de este emprendimiento global. Por ejemplo, Ostrom argumenta que las iniciativas para reducir los riesgos asociados a la emisión de gases de efecto invernadero deberían fomentar enfoques policéntricos, que podrían lograr beneficios a múltiples escalas y para diferentes actores. Otros están preocupados por los impactos de REDD+ sobre los pueblos y las comunidades indígenas, la capacidad de los gobiernos para presentar informes adecuados sobre las reducciones de emisiones o para controlar posibles casos de corrupción. Después de todo, REDD+ es más que un esquema de financiamiento para países en desarrollo y probablemente evolucionará hacia un sistema de comercio de carbono basado en el mercado. No obstante, esta última opción conlleva múltiples intereses en juego por varios actores y es mucho más polémica.
En ese contexto, los formuladores de políticas han empezado a darse cuenta en qué medida el éxito de REDD+ depende de cambios en la gobernanza forestal a múltiples niveles. Los numerosos temas controversiales que emergen de las múltiples reivindicaciones sobre los bosques, sus usos y sus valores ha estimulado el interés en conocer más sobre los obstáculos y desafíos para mejorar la gobernanza forestal. Como resultado, ha aumentado la necesidad de impulsar la investigación.
A menudo, los bosques se han tratado como «tierra ociosa» a los que se les debe dar un uso «productivo», y solo en el pasado reciente se han reconocido las múltiples funciones y los valores de los bosques. Las actividades de agricultura y ganadería, minería e infraestructura siguen ejerciendo presiones directas e indirectas sobre los bosques, aportando el 15% del cómputo global de emisiones de gases efecto invernadero. El crecimiento de estos sectores se sustenta cada vez más en la creciente demanda de mercados y políticas nacionales y mundiales que aumentan las presiones sobre los bosques. Casi siempre estas políticas buscan el beneficio de grupos relativamente pequeños pero poderosos, que en el pasado se han opuesto a cualquier revisión del statu quo y que, probablemente, continúen haciéndolo. El mayor desafío en la actualidad para la investigación sobre la gobernanza forestal es analizar cómo se han gobernado diversos valores y usos forestales, extraer lecciones sobre las causas de éxito y fracaso e identificar futuras opciones y respuestas de políticas para un cambio transformador si los bosques y REDD+ han de lograr su potencial.

 

Autores: Petkova, Elena / Larson, Anne / Pacheco, Pablo (editores)

¿Cómo Obligar Al Sector Del Aceite De Palma A Rendir Cuentas?

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:

País:
Editorial:


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Las plantaciones de palma de aceite continúan expandiéndose rápidamente por todo el mundo. El país que encabeza esta tendencia, Indonesia, ha dejado atrás a Malasia y se ha convertido en el mayor productor. Según los últimos datos que ha proporcionado la ONG indonesia SawitWatch que vigila a este sector, actualmente las plantaciones de palma de aceite de INdonesia cubren 11 millones de hectáreas, mientras que hace tan solo cinco años cubrían 6 millones.

Menos Fincas = Más Bosque = ¿menos Diversidad Biológica?

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Si la tala de los bosques tropicales para la agricultura es una de las causas principales de la catastrófica reducción de la diversidad biológica, la sabiduría convencional nos dice que la reducción del número de fincas y la expansión de los bosques podría ayudar a revertir ese declive, por lo menos a nivel local. Sin embargo, un reciente artículo de los investigadores James P. Robson y Fikret Berkes de la Universidad de Manitoba sugiere que esta suposición puede no ser cierta. El artículo, publicado en la revista Global Environmental Change, está basado en los resultados del trabajo de campo realizado en el estado de Oaxaca, México, una región que cuenta con una gran diversidad tanto biológica como cultural. Las dos comunidades indígenas estudiadas a fondo por estos investigadores están perdiendo fincas y ganando bosques a medida que sus residentes van abandonando sus tierras para desplazarse a ciudades o buscar fuentes de ingreso no agrícola. Aun así, de acuerdo a los autores, es posible que estos territorios comunitarios también estén perdiendo diversidad biológica.

 

Autores: Padoch, Christine

Protegiendo los bosques y luchando contra el cambio climático: del papel a la práctica en REDD +

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías: ,

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Con nuevas investigaciones que demuestran que los bosques pueden absorber hasta un tercio de las emisiones de los combustibles fósiles, más de 1,000 expertos, activistas, negociadores del gobierno y líderes mundiales se reunirán en el marco de la Cumbre de la ONU sobre cambio climático en Durban, el próximo mes, para discutir cuál es la mejor forma de aprovechar los bosques y los recursos forestales para frenar el ritmo del calentamiento global y ayudar a las comunidades a adaptarse a un entorno cambiante.

Opportunities and challenges for sustainable production and marketing of gums and resins in Ethiopia

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Ethiopia has widely differing agro-ecological zones, commonly classified into highlands – areas above 1500 metres above sea level – and lowlands, those below. Arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs), a class of drylands, are important in both the highlands and the lowlands of Ethiopia. These areas are povertystricken and largely food insecure, despite being endowed with resources that could provide alternative and sustainable livelihoods if they were properly exploited and developed. Vegetation in Ethiopia’s ASALs includes diverse plant species that produce commercially important oleo-gum resins such as gum arabic, frankincense, myrrh and opoponax. These products have been traded both locally and internationally for centuries and make a significant contribution to the national and local economies. They also have a range of industrial applications.
The production of gums and resins can be successfully integrated with livestock husbandry, apiculture and ecotourism, thus helping to diversify and sustain dryland livelihood options and increase household income. The important role of dry forests in soil and water conservation, biodiversity management and the fight against desertification is well known. Nonetheless, management of dry forests in order to enhance the economic and ecological benefits of gum- and resinproducing tree species is limited. One of the major constraints on promoting sustainable management of dry forests and their valuable tree species is the lack of awareness of their importance combined with inadequate knowledge about sustainable production and marketing of their products. Building understanding of the constraints and opportunities is an important step in closing this knowledge gap.
Our partners in Ethiopia and in the region requested the collection and compilation of available information on the production and marketing of gums and resins. The result is this publication, which sets out the need for vegetation-based land management as a sustainable option for the country’s drylands, and highlights the potential and constraints related to the production and marketing of gums and resins in Ethiopia. We hope the information in this publication proves relevant for policymakers, researchers, teachers, development practitioners, investors and the public at large.

 

Autores: Lemenih, Mulugeta / Kassa, Habtemariam

Introduction to the special issue onf forests and gender

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The United Nations General Assembly declared 2011 as the International Year of Forests (IYOF). The IYOF is intended to raise awareness and strengthen sustainable forest management, conservation and sustainable development of all types of forests for the benefit of current and future generations. Yet even as the world celebrates the role of forests and trees in enhancing economic, social and environmental benefits of some of the worlds’ poorest, core challenges remain.

 

Autores: Mwangi, E. / Mai, Y. H.

Diagnóstico de la situación actual sobre políticas, información, avances y necesidades futuras sobre MRV en Bolivia

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Gracias al importante apoyo económico de la Embajada de Noruega y otros donantes, CIFOR, el Centro Internacional de Investigación Forestal, está haciendo muchos esfuerzos para reunir información disponible sobre las políticas nacionales, prácticas, experiencias, datos existentes y avances desarrollados en diferentes países del mundo. De esta manera, CIFOR está trabajando por lo menos en 9 países de Latinoamérica, África y Asia. Bolivia es uno de los sitios de trabajo del proyecto “El aprendizaje de REDD: Estudio Global comparativo” liderado por CIFOR. Por lo tanto, para tener una idea cabal de la situación actual sobre MRV y para iniciar acciones en Bolivia, el IBIF, Instituto Boliviano de Investigación Forestal, como uno de los socios en Bolivia, está encargado de investigar acerca de las políticas actuales y futuras del Estado Boliviano a ese respecto y de los avances en el país en términos de Monitoreo, Reporte y Verificación (MRV). Además, se le encarga al IBIF elaborar un documento detallando la situación actual de la información disponible relacionada al tema REDD e identificar los vacíos de información y las posibles acciones que se pueden tomar en el tema a nivel país.

 

Autores: Villegas, Zulma / Mostacedo, Bonifacio

Moving ahead with REDD, issues, options and implications

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries constitute some 20 percent of the total global emission of greenhouse gases annually. These large emissions are not included today under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) or its Kyoto Protocol.
If we are to be serious in our efforts to combat climate change and limit the rise in global temperature to no more than 2°C, reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) in developing countries must be included in the next global climate regime.
REDD has the potential to generate substantial benefits in addition to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. These include positive impacts on biodiversity and on sustainable development, including poverty reduction and strengthening indigenous peoples’ rights. Thus, if designed properly, REDD may produce a triple dividend – gains for the climate, for biodiversity and for sustainable development.
At the Thirteenth Session of the Conference of Parties in Bali in December 2007, Norway launched its International Climate and Forest Initiative. Through this initiative, Norway is prepared to allocate up to NOK 3 billion a year to REDD efforts in developing countries over the next 5 years. The contributions from Norway and other donor countries, as well as multilateral agencies, must be seen as demonstrations of sincere interest and commitment to contribute towards reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries.
It will, however, be possible to achieve large-scale and sustainable reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries only if these emissions are included in a global post-2012 climate regime.
While the underlying idea of REDD is simple, there are complex issues to be solved, such as measurement, scale, funding, permanence, liability, leakage and reference levels. Norway has supported the production of this book with the aim to facilitate progress of the UNFCCC negotiations on these complex issues by clarifying options associated with each issue – and especially their implications for effectiveness, efficiency and equity.
With strong political will from all parties, it is our hope and ambition that REDD can be included in the next climate agreement in a way that yields the triple dividend.
Erik Solheim
Minister of Environment and International Development
Norway

 

Autores: Angelsen, Arid

Social sustainability of EU-approved voluntary schemes for biofuels

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:


» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The rapid expansion of biofuel production and consumption in response to global climate mitigation commitments and fuel security concerns has raised concerns over the social and environmental sustainability of biofuel feedstock production, processing and trade. The European Union has thus balanced the commitment to biofuels as one of the options for meeting its renewable energy targets for the transport sector with a set of sustainability criteria for economic operators supplying biofuels to its member states. Seven voluntary ‘EU sustainability schemes’ for biofuels were approved in July 2011 as a means to verify compliance. While mandated sustainability criteria of the EU Renewable Energy Directive (EU RED) have a strong environmental focus, a number of these voluntary schemes have social sustainability as a significant component of their requirements for achieving certification. As several of these voluntary schemes are incipient, thereby limiting evidence on their effectiveness in practice, we have undertaken a comparative analysis of the substantive content or ‘scope’ of these schemes and the likely procedural effectiveness of the same. Findings show that some schemes have considerable coverage of social sustainability concerns. At the same time, three factors are likely to undermine the achievement of social sustainability through these schemes and the EU sustainability policies lending credibility to them: poor coverage of some critical social sustainability components, the presence of schemes lacking any social sustainability requirements and gaps in procedural rules.

 

Autores: German, Laura / Schoneveld, George

Vulnerabilidad de los bosques y sus servicios ambientales al cambio climático

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,
Categorías: ,

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Muchos estudios científicos han resaltado la vulnerabilidad de los bosques tropicales a los efectos adversos del cambio climático y de la variabilidad climática (IPCC, 2001; CBD, 2003). En este documento se presentan conceptos y ejemplos de sensibilidad de los bosques, de impactos y de adaptación autónoma. Se hace énfasis en las consecuencias del cambio climático sobre los bienes y servicios ambientales brindados por los bosques. También se proponen medidas de adaptación para reducir su vulnerabilidad al cambio climático.

Climate impacts, forest-dependent rural livelihoods and adaptation strategies in Africa: A review

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: , ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The long term contribution of forests to the livelihoods of the rural poor had been long appreciated. More than half of Africa’s fast-growing population rely directly and indirectly on forests for their livelihoods. As the continent faces stresses from poverty and economic development, another major uncertainty is looming that could alter many of the relationships between people and forests. This uncertainty is climate change. Climate impacts such as changes in temperature and rainfall patterns resulting in drought, flooding, all exert significant effect on forest ecosystems and their provision of goods and services, which form the safety nets for many African rural poor. Building adaptation strategies becomes an option for forest-dependent households and communities, and even countries whose economies largely depend on the related sectors. The review details cases of impacts, underlying causes of vulnerability, and identified coping and adaptation strategies, as reported in their National Communications by many African countries to the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change.

 

Autores: Somorin, Olufonso A.

Standards and methods available for estimating project-level REDD+ carbon benefits

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The aim of this reference guide is to identify and recommend best practices and methodological guidance to project developers on how to design robust methodologies to account for the carbon benefits of project activities included under the REDD+ umbrella, namely:
1. reducing emissions from deforestation;
2. reducing emissions from forest degradation;
3. conservation of forest carbon stocks;
4. sustainable management of forests; and
5. enhancement of forest carbon stocks.

 

Autores: Estrada, Manuel

Lessons for REDD+ from measures to control illegal logging in Indonesia

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

What lessons for the ongoing design of REDD+ mechanisms, processes and institutions in Indonesia can be learnt from experience with measures to combat illegal logging in Indonesia?
Indonesia has committed to reducing its emissions from land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) by 26% by 2020 (GoI 2010). One way the country plans to meet this target is by reducing its emissions from deforestation and forest degradation through the REDD+ mechanism. By implementing REDD+, Indonesia will become eligible to receive financial payments based on forest carbon credits. A substantial amount of Indonesia’s carbon emissions are caused by deforestation and forest degradation from land conversion activities, forest fires and illegal logging, with the latter having significant impacts as a driver of deforestation. Therefore, initiatives to curb illegal logging will have to form a central part of any emission reduction strategy. REDD+ has the potential to help reduce illegal logging activities by creating financial incentives to encourage compliance with the law, changes in behaviour and wider governance reforms.
Since 2001, several initiatives in Indonesia have attempted to address the problem of illegal logging. These include international initiatives such as the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) process; bilateral agreements between Indonesia and major importers of timber; and market instruments such as timber certification. National initiatives include joint security sweeps (Operasi Hutan Lestari or OHL, sustainable forest operation) to combat illegal logging, anti-money laundering approaches to tackle illegal finance in the sector and the expansion of timber plantations to increase the supply of timber.
This working paper explores ways in which the ongoing design of REDD+ mechanisms and institutions can benefit from these experiences. The authors obtained their data through literature reviews, press/media reviews and selected stakeholder interviews. This working paper focuses primarily on the FLEGT–VPA (Voluntary Partnership Agreement), and the associated SVLK (Sistem Veri!kasi Legalitas Kayu, or timber legality verification standards), as a trade-related measure, and on enforcement measures such as the OHL. In doing so, it explores some of the key di”erences and similarities between FLEGT and REDD+. FLEGT aims to ensure that timber is produced in accordance with the laws of a country, using access to the international market as an incentive. REDD+ aims to create performance-based monetary incentives to halt deforestation and forest degradation. Obtaining REDD+ finance will require attention to aspects such as credibility, traceability and social and governance safeguards as well as independent verification. The SVLK has had to develop mechanisms to address all these aspects. therefore, its lessons are likely to be relevant to REDD+ and there may be opportunities for synergies between the systems and the ways in which they have dealt with these concerns. The REDD+ and FLEGT processes are both nationally designed mechanisms that require implementation at the local level. This raises the question of how these processes can design incentive structures given the ongoing decentralisation reforms in Indonesia in order to ensure subnational ownership. Lessons from the OHLs are also useful in examining this issue.
Lessons from illegal logging measures can be divided into process lessons and outcome lessons. Process lessons examine how the mechanism was designed and implemented. Outcome lessons consider the impact that such measures have, or can have, in tackling deforestation, forest degradation and the underlying governance causes. In terms of process, several pertinent aspects of the design of the SVLK mirror the concerns raised in current discussions on the design of REDD+ institutions and systems. The SVLK was initially developed in a context where the existing forest control system was perceived as lacking the independence and transparency needed for international credibility. Much of the design has focused on ways to address these deficits. In terms of outcomes, it is too early to make firm conclusions about the impact of the existing processes. For example, bilateral arrangements between Indonesia and timber-purchasing countries helped to raise awareness about problems with the illegal logging trade in consumer countries and provided significant resources for capacity building in Indonesia. However, it is not clear to what extent they actually helped reduce the illegal timber trade. For this reason, much of the emphasis in this paper is on process. However, we do explore some issues in terms of their potential ability to tackle governance aspects and conclude with a discussion of the degree to which we can expect the measures to be able to resolve more deep-seated governance issues.
!e working paper is structured as follows. Section 2 discusses the Indonesian context of illegal logging and various measures taken over the years to control it (including FLEGT). Section 3 introduces the REDD+ context and explains its relationship with efforts to combat illegal logging; current REDD+ policies and initiatives in Indonesia are presented in detail in Section 3.1. Section 4 discusses monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems focusing on concerns of institutional design issues such as the need for clear standards, independent verification, transparency and the inclusion of safeguards. Section 5 focuses on process issues, including how to ensure ownership and multi-stakeholder engagement in the process. Section 6 explores the degree to which these processes can address fundamental underlying governance issues. Section 7 distils the main cross-cutting issues for tackling illegal logging and the implementation of REDD+ in Indonesia, and the working paper ends with a summary of the key messages and recommendations.

 

Autores: Luttrell, Cecilia / Obidzinski, Krystof / Brockhaus, Maria / Muharrom, Efrian / Petkova, Elena / Wardell, Andrew / Halperin, James

Emerging REDD+; A preliminary survey of demonstration and readiness activities

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

This paper presents the results of a preliminary survey of emerging demonstration and readiness activities to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and carbon stock enhancement (REDD+) across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The survey was conducted between November and December 2008, and the information collected was updated until May 2009. While the results of the survey offer a useful snapshot of the landscape of REDD+ activities, they do not capture all the dynamics associated with this rapidly evolving field. As the international debate on REDD+ continues, some projects surveyed may have changed their core objectives and activities, while others may never get off the ground. Another limitation of the survey is the ongoing lack of any clear definition of what constitutes a REDD+ demonstration activity. Despite these shortcomings, this survey offers insights on current trends to inform future REDD+ investments.
In total the survey found over 100 REDD+ activities: 44 demonstration activities, 65 readiness activities (including those by the Forest Carbon Partnerhship Facility and the UN-REDD Programme) and 12 activities where carbon is not an explicit goal. Indonesia has by far the most demonstration activities in the pipeline, making Asia the region with the largest number of REDD+ activities. Many projects (68%) are still in the planning stage.
A preliminary assessment of incipient REDD+ investments shows the following. First, REDD+ initiatives, especially demonstration activities, tend to target countries where deforestation or the risk of Abstract deforestation is significant, which suggests realised carbon effectiveness considerations. Second, poor governance contexts do not discourage REDD+ investments, although cost-efficiency considerations may suggest otherwise. Third, although there is scope for natural equity and co-benefits, there is also a risk of trade-offs between carbon effectiveness and cobenefits. Dry forests – where many rural poor live and where there are high levels of biodiversity – tend to be carbon poor and, thus, feature far less in REDD+ demonstration activities than humid forests.
Balancing trade-offs between cost-effectiveness and co-benefit considerations will likely become a central challenge for REDD+ policies and activities. Spatially explicit, high-resolution, environmental and socioeconomic data can offer new scope for REDD+ investments to enhance carbon goals while securing REDD+ co-benefits. Policy makers, donors, and other investors in REDD+ and/or REDD+ co-benefits could assemble such data to enhance their investment choices, monitor their outcomes, and thus provide valuable lessons to inform the national and global REDD+ architecture.
Although performance-based payments analogous to payments for environmental services (PES) are core features of the REDD+ idea, the survey further shows that REDD+ policies will require more than PES-type REDD+ schemes. Investments in improved governance and broader policy reforms are equally important to address the root causes of forest emissions. Finding the right policy mix in different country contexts is an important challenge ahead.

 

Autores: Wertz Kanounnikoff, Sheila / Kongphan Apirak, Metta

Incentives + How can REDD improve well-being in forest communities?

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Initiatives to reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) will directly affect the 1 to 1.6 billion people who depend on forests and who are among the world’s poorest. REDD mechanisms are more likely to succeed if they build on (rather than conflict with) the interests of local communities and indigenous groups. REDD also offers a critical opportunity to enhance forest communities’ wellbeing, a principle upheld by several international agreements and widely accepted voluntary standards related to REDD.

This Infobrief discusses how REDD can be designed to benefit local people while also reducing emissions. Lessons are drawn from incentive-based approaches to forest conservation and recent experiences in six countries (Brazil, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Tanzania and Nepal).3 The findings suggest that the success of REDD and its impacts on communities will depend on the linkages between incentives and long-term development opportunities, resource rights and political participation for marginalised forest communities, as well as their distribution across different levels (community, district, nation) and entities (communities, timber industry, local government).

 

Autores: Wollenberg, Eva / Springate Bagisnki, Oliver

El estado de las negociaciones REDD

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial: , , , ,
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Puntos de consenso, opciones para seguir avanzando y necesidades de investigación para respaldar el proceso

Documento de referencia para grupos regionales patrocinado por el programa REDD de las Naciones Unidas

Programa de Colaboración de las Naciones Unidas de reducción de las emisiones debidas a la deforestación y la degradación forestal en los países en desarrollo (UN-REDD por sus siglas en inglés) encomendó al Centro para la Investigación Forestal Internacional elaborar un informe que resumiera el estado de las negociaciones en curso hacia Copenhague, específicamente en lo que hace a las áreas de consenso, opciones para resolver aspectos donde aún existen divergencias de opiniones y prioridades de investigación orientadas a apoyar la implementación exitosa de un programa internacional REDD luego de una decisión de la XV Conferencia de las Partes (COP) en Copenhague.
La primera sección de este informe (Capítulo 2) resume datos publicados recientemente que sugieren que las emisiones relacionadas con el bosque están en el orden de 5.8 gigatones por año y que estas emisiones podrían estar aumentando a nivel global. La expansión agrícola continúa siendo uno de los principales impulsores de la deforestación en los países en desarrollo, puesto que los cultivos y pastizales han experimentado un aumento importante en todos los continentes. El crecimiento de los pastizales representa cerca de dos tercios del crecimiento total del área agrícola. Únicamente una parte de este crecimiento está relacionado con emisiones derivadas de la deforestación porque no todas las tierras que se convierten a la agricultura constituyen tierras forestales. No obstante, la expansión agrícola es la principal causa de la deforestación a nivel mundial. En la actualidad, ella está siendo causada principalmente por empresas agrícolas antes que por las necesidades de subsistencia de los agricultores o por el desarrollo de la colonización, como sucedía en el pasado.
El Capítulo 3 se refiere al alcance y la escala de REDD-plus1. Existe un consenso general de que las actividades de REDD-plus podrían formar parte importante de los esfuerzos de mitigación en países en desarrollo. También hay acuerdo de que la implementación de estas actividades debería generar los así llamados “beneficios colaterales” o beneficios de desarrollo sostenible en países que implementan actividades REDD-plus. Asimismo existe coincidencia en relación a que REDD-plus debería basarse en reducciones de emisiones medibles y verificables. Finalmente, existe consenso de que un acuerdo REDD-plus debería ser implementado a nivel nacional, en lugar del nivel subnacional.
Aún no se ha logrado un consenso sobre si debería existir un conjunto de medidas básicas contra la deforestación/degradación, y un conjunto secundario para otras opciones de mitigación relacionadas con el bosque. El Plan de Acción de Bali se refiere a acciones que promuevan el ‘aumento de las reservas forestales de carbono’. No queda claro si las Partes pretenden que esta mejora en las reservas incluya la restauración de los bosques solamente en tierras ya clasificadas como bosques, o también la forestación en tierras que no son bosques. Existe la necesidad de contar con definiciones para la degradación forestal, conservación forestal, gestión sostenible de los bosques, y el aumento de las reservas de carbono. Existen dos maneras de abordar esta necesidad. Primero, las partes podrían intentar definir cada actividad individual en base a un conjunto único de criterios. Una segunda alternativa es utilizar la Guía de Buenas Prácticas (2003) y la revisión de las Orientaciones para los inventarios nacionales de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI), ambos elaborados por el Panel Intergubernamental de Expertos sobre Cambio Climático (IPCC) (2006GL).
El Capítulo 4 aborda el tema del financiamiento y la distribución de beneficios. Las Partes coinciden en que se necesita un marco de financiamiento efectivo para la provisión de recursos financieros e inversión para apoyar mejores acciones de mitigación, adaptación y cooperación tecnológica. Existe consenso sobre la necesidad de contar con varias fuentes y opciones para aumentar la generación de recursos financieros nuevos, adicionales y adecuados. Se considera que un enfoque basado en un Fondo REDD sería más apropiado para el desarrollo de capacidades y actividades demostrativas (de preparación). Los enfoques vinculados al mercado pueden ser utilizados mejor para expandir la implementación de las actividades REDD. Existe consenso que los recursos financieros deben ser nuevos, adicionales, adecuados, predecibles y sostenibles. La generación de recursos debería realizarse teniendo en cuenta principios de equidad, responsabilidades comunes pero diferenciadas, y las diversas capacidades de los países. Las Partes coinciden en la necesidad de contar con incentivos positivos y apoyar acciones bajo REDD-plus. Por lo tanto, se requiere apoyo financiero para los procesos de reformas de políticas y para el desarrollo de capacidades. Existe consenso en que la gobernanza de un marco financiero debería estar bajo la orientación y autoridad de la Conferencia de las Partes.
Las Partes y observadores han presentado ideas y propuestas para la generación de recursos financieros que incluyen enfoques de política, incentivos positivos, el uso de enfoques no vinculados al mercado y una combinación de enfoques relacionados y no con el mercado. Existe una gama de opiniones respecto al papel que debían tener los sectores público y privado en la generación de recursos financieros para acciones mejoradas. Se debe otorgar mayor consideración a la forma en que el financiamiento público puede incrementar financiamiento privado efectivamente y garantizar coherencia entre las diferentes fuentes de financiamiento. También es necesario considerar otros principios propuestos por las Partes, como el principio de que ‘el contaminador paga’ y el principio de la ‘responsabilidad histórica’. Un enfoque que podría ayudar a superar el impasse actual es un medio novedoso de atribuir responsabilidades en las reducciones de emisiones según la proporción de la población que tiene un estilo de vida basado en un uso intensivo de carbono. Mediante este enfoque, el principio de responsabilidades comunes pero diferenciadas es definido por las emisiones de individuos en lugar de naciones. También se necesita otorgar mayor consideración a las diferentes formas de apoyar la implementación de acciones bajo el mecanismo REDD-plus. Las partes han propuesto una variada gama de enfoques, la mayor parte de los cuales dependen del desempeño de los países (i.e. los fondos están disponibles después de haber alcanzado una meta). Asimismo se deben tener en cuenta consideraciones relativas a la gobernanza y el arreglo institucional para el manejo y entrega de los recursos financieros que tendrán un impacto en las negociaciones REDD. Las opciones para los arreglos institucionales para la implementación del marco financiero incluyen la creación de nuevas instituciones o la reforma de las instituciones existentes.
Una atención especial requiere la distribución equitativa de fondos. Las propuestas de la mayoría de las Partes y observadores no ofrecen condiciones para la redistribución de los beneficios derivados del financiamiento de carbono; algunos países incluso se han opuesto a una redistribución de los mismos. La mayor parte de propuestas recompensan a los emisores con tendencias históricas altas y excluyen a quienes han mantenido tendencias bajas. La cuestión de la equidad es abordada en parte mediante la expansión de las actividades permitidas en el esquema REDD-plus y hay varias propuestas que encaran la manera en que el financiamiento podría dirigirse a apoyar estas actividades, la mayoría de las cuales está basada en un enfoque por etapas que empiezan con la deforestación y degradación de los bosques y se amplían con el tiempo para incluir sumideros y conservación de los bosques.
La investigación podría apoyar inversiones más eficientes y efectivas en esquemas nacionales REDDplus elucidando las causas principales de la deforestación en diferentes contextos nacionales para ayudar a estructurar mecanismos de incentivos efectivos para modificar los incentivos económicos que promueven la deforestación y degradación de los bosques. Una segunda área de investigación está vinculada a entender las configuraciones que se requieren para crear un ambiente institucional apropiado en los diferentes contextos nacionales. Asimismo, una mayor atención requiere la distribución de beneficios con las comunidades localizadas en los márgenes de los bosques. Los derechos de propiedad (incluyendo los derechos al carbono y a los servicios de los sistemas ecológicos), están recibiendo mucha atención en los análisis relacionados con REDD e con UTCUTS. La investigación podría ayudar a mejorar el conocimiento sobre el papel que los derechos de propiedad en el desempeño exitoso de estos esquemas y la forma que adoptan los diferentes derechos de propiedad forestales en cada uno de los diferentes contextos nacionales.

El Capítulo 5 aborda cuestiones relacionadas con el monitoreo, reporte y verificación (MRV por sus siglas en inglés). Existen varios temas asociados con el MRV que van a tener un impacto en la implementación de REDD y aspectos del MRV que son específicos a REDD. En lo que hace a los aspectos más generales relacionados con MRV, las Partes coinciden en que la medición y el reporte de acciones voluntarias realizadas por los países en desarrollo relacionadas con la mitigación del cambio climático necesitan incluir información sobre la implementación de los planes, programas y acciones voluntarias de mitigación. Esto debe incluir el monitoreo de reducción de emisiones de GEI alcanzadas por la acción en relación a las trayectorias nacionales de emisiones de GEI, el costo incremental de la acción, y el desarrollo sostenible de beneficios y beneficios colaterales. En cuestiones especificas al esquema REDD-plus, las Partes coinciden que el MRV debería tomar en cuenta emisiones de referencia y niveles de referencia. Una metodología común debería ser usada por todos los enfoques de política basada en análisis de sensores remotos y verificación in situ. El MRV va a precisar tanto de sistemas robustos de monitoreo forestal como de verificación ex-post. También hay consenso en que el MRV debería basarse en inventarios forestales nacionales y revisiones periódicas e imparciales para evaluar la aplicación de las modalidades acordadas, incluyendo la revisión de los datos.
Entre los temas pendientes, la cuestión de qué monitorear debe ser resuelta antes de que las discusiones puedan seguir adelante. Se les podría solicitar a los países que incluyan los cinco reservorios de carbono (biomasa sobre el suelo, biomasa subterránea, carbono orgánico del suelo, madera muerta y residuos) en sus evaluaciones de emisiones. Como alternativa, se les podría permitir a los países elegir qué reservorios incluir y proporcionar evidencia de su capacidad de conservación en el tiempo respecto a las emisiones de carbono de su elección. Si bien existe consenso acerca de que el nivel de referencia (RL por sus siglas en inglés) debería basarse en los niveles históricos de emisiones, no existe acuerdo sobre lo que constituye el nivel de referencia. Algunas partes prefieren utilizar ‘niveles de referencia de emisiones’ (REL por sus siglas en inglés), mientras que otros prefieren la flexibilidad de establecer RL que no estén vinculados a las emisiones. Existen varias opciones para resolver este problema utilizando ya sea paneles de expertos independientes o el Organismo Subsidiario de Consejería Científica y Técnica de la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre Cambio Climático (SBSTA por sus siglas en inglés) para que aprueben los RL/REL. El paso siguiente es resolver si el monitoreo será realizado en base a emisiones brutas o netas. La contabilidad basada en emisiones brutas no incluiría los reservorios de carbono por el reemplazo de vegetación, lo que resultaría en un sistema de dos niveles. Por un lado se utilizarían las emisiones brutas para la deforestación y, por otro, las emisiones netas para otros aspectos de REDD-plus. Otra área a ser considerada es si se van a medir las fugas y cómo hacerlo, y si los efectos sobre la biodiversidad y otros impactos y beneficios colaterales deberían ser incluidos en el monitoreo.
La investigación puede apoyar tanto el establecimiento de los niveles de referencia como la contabilidad de carbono. Existen pocas orientaciones en los textos de la Convención Marco de Naciones Unidas para el Cambio Climático (CMNUCC) y no hay consenso entre los expertos sobre cómo establecer un LR/REL. Un área importante de investigación para apoyar un programa REDDplus debería ser desarrollar métodos y enfoques para la integración de datos históricos de deforestación con conocimiento de los factores causantes de la deforestación para construir escenarios y proporcionar estimaciones razonables de emisiones futuras. Con respecto a la contabilidad de carbono, las directrices del IPCC para los inventarios nacionales de GEI (2006LG) ofrecen las metodologías más actualizadas de contabilidad de carbono y cubren todos los casos posibles en un programa REDD-plus. Una limitación es no contar con factores específicos al país o región para estas ecuaciones de contabilidad de GEI, la que podría ser superada en parte mediante un esfuerzo concertado de investigación y, de hecho, se podrían dar progresos significativos durante los próximos cinco años. La investigación necesita concentrarse en proporcionar los factores apropiados para ecuaciones que puedan mejorar la contabilidad de carbono tanto a nivel de proyecto como a nivel nacional, particularmente en lo que respecta a abordar las especificaciones de Etapa 22. Finalmente, se necesita llevar a cabo investigaciones que sugieran métodos para vincular las actividades de monitoreo, estimación y contabilidad del nivel nacional con actividades a nivel subnacional. Esta área de investigación incluye desarrollar enfoques para la participación comunitaria en la contabilidad a nivel de proyecto, desarrollar métodos para vincular las líneas de base de proyectos y desempeño con las líneas de base nacionales y puntos de referencia nacionales, así como desarrollar innovaciones a nivel institucional que serán requeridas para implementar el esquema nacional REDD-plus.
El Capítulo 6 presenta cuestiones relacionadas a la participación de los actores interesados. No se ha alcanzado consenso hasta ahora y las partes se están inclinando hacia un compromiso que haga referencia a la necesidad de que la ‘población local’ participe en el proceso de consulta durante el diseño de los proyectos REDD y el esquema REDD a nivel nacional. Esto deja abierta la posibilidad de abordar este tema con mayor detalle una vez que se hayan decidido las modalidades del mecanismo REDD. Existen varias opciones disponibles para garantizar una participación apropiada de las partes interesadas en el desarrollo de programas nacionales y proyectos específicos REDD. Una posibilidad es que las modalidades REDD incluyan principios orientadores que, en el nivel nacional, específicamente hagan referencia a los derechos de acceso a información y consulta en los procesos de toma de decisiones. Estos principios mejorarían la participación de los diferentes actores interesados al incluir referencias a los derechos procesales dentro de los procesos REDD y derechos vinculado a la tierra y a los recursos naturales. Una posibilidad sería que REDD haga referencia a las obligaciones actualmente contraídas en instrumentos de derechos humanos como la Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de Pueblos Indígenas (UNRIP por sus siglas en inglés). Sin embargo, la desventaja es que algunas de las Partes no son signatarios de estos acuerdos.
Un área que podría ser elegida para llevar a cabo investigación especifica es la referida a equidad de género y equidad de los grupos indígenas y minorías en proyectos REDD-plus. Las mujeres han recibido históricamente muy poco de los beneficios asociados con las plantaciones de árboles y, en ocasiones, están prohibidas de sembrar árboles por las costumbres locales. Sin embargo, considerando que se espera que las mujeres pobres desempeñen un papel importante en los proyectos REDD, tanto en la producción de carbono como en el diseñado e implementación de los proyectos, se deben hacer esfuerzos para llevar a cabo un análisis completo de la participación de las mujeres en los esquemas REDD. Otra área de investigación podría tener como objetivo la definición de condiciones que favorezcan un consentimiento previo e informado en la participación de los pueblos indígenas y las comunidades locales en la estrategia REDD, y en el diseño, implementación y revisión de proyectos a nivel nacional y local. Finalmente, para poder tomar decisiones informadas de cómo implementar REDD a nivel nacional, los gobiernos se beneficiarían de una evaluación de las implicaciones sociales de los diferentes enfoques para abordar factores relevantes y en ocasiones esenciales para el éxito de REDD. Dicha evaluación debería delinear opciones así como los costos de abordar cuestiones relativas a los derechos y la tenencia, mapeo y demarcación de tierras, integración de políticas a favor de los pobres, cambios en las prioridades de desarrollo y alinear REDD en base a las mismas.
El capítulo final de este informe aborda los beneficios colaterales, ambientales y sociales. La Orientación Indicativa para las actividades de demostración del Plan de Acción de Bali señala que ‘Las actividades de demostración deberían ser compatibles con el manejo sostenible de los bosques teniendo en cuenta, entre otras cosas, las disposiciones pertinentes del Foro de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Bosques, la Convención de las Naciones Unidas de Lucha contra la Desertificación y el Convenio sobre la Biodiversidad Biológica’. Este sentimiento está reflejado en el borrador del documento de la asamblea3 en  varios lugares y en los textos de negociación del Organismo Subsidiario de Consejería Científica y Técnica de la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre Cambio Climático.
Sin embargo, todavía no se ha llegado a un acuerdo si los beneficios colaterales ambientales y sociales (a nivel nacional y comunitario) deberían ser reglamentados, y cómo hacerlo, en el diseño del régimen internacional REDD-plus. Algunos favorecen un REDD-plus simple y no desean cargarlo con requisitos adicionales. Otros, que favorecen el enfoque ‘pro pobre’, consideran que REDD no va a tener éxito a menos que se incluya específicamente los objetivos de beneficios colaterales en el diseño de REDD-plus. No hay duda de que las decisiones relativas al diseño del mecanismo financiero tendrán implicaciones importantes para la generación de co-beneficios ambientales y sociales.
Es importante anotar que existe una serie de necesidades de investigación en lo que hace a entender mejor los beneficios colaterales. Primero, si se van a medir los beneficios, es necesario contar con indicadores apropiados que hayan sido aceptados a nivel internacional. Segundo, es necesario desarrollar conocimiento para generar sinergias entre los beneficios colaterales y los beneficios atmosféricos dentro de los diferentes contextos nacionales, así como entender los trade-offs entre los diferentes objetivos. Finalmente, existe la necesidad de llevar a cabo investigación de mercado sobre el comportamiento de los inversionistas y los diseñadores de proyectos, y las preocupaciones relativas a la obligación de los proyectos de generar estos beneficios colaterales.

 

Autores: Verchot, Louis V. / Petkova, Elena

Community forest management and the struggle for equity

Tipo de acervo:

Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The central thesis of the article is that \”sustainable forest management\” including attention to human well being, cannot happen without increased flexibility for those working in the field.

The many national programs purporting to encourage \”community management\” are plagued by problems some of which derive from too rigid adherence to pre-planned implementation procedures. The CIFOR\\\\’s program presented in this document, focuses on improved collaboration among stakeholders in the forest, strengthened two-way communication links between communities, and group/social learning in pursuit of adaptive management, using participatory action research. Training in transformative learning; devolution of community level authority to smaller groups; use of multi-stakeholder workshops; multiple stakeholder visioning exercises; collaboration with NGOs; boundary demarcation as a means to facilitate coordination among communities; are some of the methods proposed by the present study.

 

Autores: Pierce Colfer, Carol J. / Prabhu, Ravi

Avancemos con REDD. Problemas, opciones y consecuencias.

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

La reducción de las emisiones de carbono derivadas de la deforestación y degradación forestal (REDD) se basa en una idea central: premiar a las personas, comunidades, proyectos y países que reducen las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI) provenientes de los bosques. REDD tiene el potencial de reducir significativamente las emisiones a un bajo costo dentro de un lapso corto de tiempo y, al mismo tiempo, contribuir a la reducción de la pobreza y al desarrollo sostenible.

Esto parece ser sencillo, sin embargo, aunque REDD se basa en una idea simple y atractiva, convertir la idea en acción es algo mucho más complejo. Debemos abordar muchas interrogantes para poder crear mecanismos que exploten todo el potencial de REDD:

?Cómo podemos medir la reducción de las emisiones de carbono cuando los datos no son exactos o no existen? ?Cómo podemos recaudar los miles de millones de dólares necesarios para poner en marcha un mecanismo REDD? ?Cómo podemos garantizar que cualquier reducción en la deforestación y degradación sea real (adicional) y no cause la tala de más árboles en otras áreas (fugas) o el próximo año (permanencia)? ?Cómo podemos garantizar que los beneficios lleguen a los pobres?
Este libro se plantea estas interrogantes, mismas que son particularmente relevantes para el diseño de la arquitectura global de REDD en el régimen climático posterior a 2012 que se está negociando en la actualidad en el marco de la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas para el Cambio Climático (CMNUCC). Cada capítulo aborda un tema importante, presenta las opciones y evalúa las implicaciones en función a tres criterios (las tres “E”): efectividad del carbono, eficiencia de costos, así como equidad y beneficios colaterales.

 

Autores: Angelsen, Arild  (editor)

Cerrando la brecha: comunidades, bosques y redes internacionales

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

El manejo forestal comunal se ha transformado en los últimos 25 años, de haber sido un método experimental para brindar leña a los habitantes pobres de áreas rurales, a ser un movimiento comunitario que demanda reformas en el sector forestal. Las redes internacionales de promoción del manejo forestal comunitario que surgieron en distintos momentos de la historia y con diferentes objetivos, metas y participantes han tenido un papel clave en esta transformación. Sobre la base de un análisis de siete países y diez redes, el presente estudio compila las principales lecciones aprendidas en esta experiencia en cuanto a efectividad de apoyo, técnicas de comunicación, gobernabilidad de las redes, relaciones con donantes y vinculación con movimientos sociales.

 

Autores: Colchester, Marcus / Apte, Tejaswini / Laforge, Michel / Mandono, Alois / Pathak, Neema

REDD, forest governance and rural livelihoods. The emerging agenda

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar: ,
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) initiatives are more likely to be effective in reducing emissions if they build on, rather than conflict with, the interests of local communities and indigenous groups (referred to henceforth as ‘forest communities’). To show how REDD could most benefit forest communities, lessons from incentive-based forest programmes and recent experiences in six countries were reviewed at an international workshop held at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in Norwich, United Kingdom, in the Spring of 2009.
Workshop participants included researchers from the Center for International Forest Research (CIFOR) and UEA, and REDD experts from six focus countries: Brazil, Indonesia, Madagascar, Tanzania, Mexico and Nepal.

 

Autores: Springate Baginski, Oliver / Wollenberg, Eva

Guide to Participatory Tools for Forest Communities

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

The future of tropical forests is increasingly linked to the people who live in or near forests and depend on them for their livelihoods. Likewise, the potential for improving the lives of forest dependent people will rely to a great degree to how well people will be able to manage their forests. In many countries tropical forest management still falls officially under the responsibility of forest agencies. However, the trend is changing, and increasingly local people are receiving custodianship and control of tropical forests. The direction that tropical forest management takes will be greatly influenced by how well local people and outside stakeholders can communicate and cooperate.
The Guide to Participatory Tools for Forest Communities hopes to provide people who work with forest communities with new options as they advance objectives of sustainable forest management and empowerment of forest dependent communities. The guide provides a brief overview of various tools, discussion of concepts, and guidance in the selection and use of participatory tools that people linked with the Center for International Forestry Research have adapted and developed for use with forest communities.
The Guide to Participatory Tools is primarily a product of the research project, “Stakeholders and Biodiversity in the Forest at the Local Level,” which is a collaborative effort between the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation (SDC) and CIFOR. The project is the second of two initiatives between SDC and CIFOR that have worked to improve people’s livelihoods and contribute to sustainable forest management through action research. The contents of the Guide to Participatory Tools, however, are the result of many years of adapting, developing and testing participatory tools by CIFOR researchers and collaborators. In addition to acknowledging the financial contribution of SDC, we gratefully recognize the efforts of the many CIFOR staff and partners who contributed directly or indirectly to this document.
Markku Kanninen
Director, Environmental Services and Sustainable Use of Forests Programme
CIFOR

 

Autores: Evans, Kristen / de Jong, Wil / Cronkleton, Peter / Sheil, Douglas / Lynam, Tim / Kusumanto, Trikurnianti / Pierce Colfer, Carol J.

Pagos por Servicios Ambientales: principios básicos esenciales

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

Los pagos por servicios ambientales (PSA) son parte de un paradigma de conservación nuevo y más directo, que explícitamente reconoce la necesidad de crear puentes entre los intereses de los propietarios de la tierra y los usuarios de los servicios. Valoraciones teóricas elocuentes han demostrado las ventajas absolutas del PSA sobre los enfoques tradicionales de conservación. En los trópicos existen algunas experiencias piloto en PSA; sin embargo, todavía hay mucho escepticismo entre quienes trabajan en el campo y entre los posibles compradores de los servicios. Este trabajo pretende ayudar a desmitificar el PSA para el neófilo, empezando con una definición simple y coherente del término. A continuación se ofrecen sugerencias prácticas para el diseño de PSA y se sopesa el nicho probable para el PSA en el portafolio de enfoques de conservación. Esta evaluación se basa en una revisión de literatura y observaciones de campo en investigaciones en América Latina y Asia.

Se concluye que la voluntad de pago de los usuarios aumentará únicamente si se logra demostrar que se han logrado ganancias positivas (‘adicionalidad’) a partir de una línea base cuidadosamente establecida, si se desarrollan procesos para fomentar la confianza en quienes proveen los servicios, y si se entiende mejor la dinámica de formas de subsistencia de quienes reciben el PSA.

 

Autores: Wunder, Sven

For better or for worse? Local impacts of the decentralization of Indonesia´s forest sector

Tipo de acervo:
Año:
Idiomas:
Lugar:
País:
Editorial:
Categorías:

» DESCARGAR AQUÍ



Sinopsis:

This paper quantifies the local impacts of mechanised logging on forest-dependent communities in Indonesia, before and after decentralization. A conceptual framework incorporates financial, social, enforcement, rent-seeking and environmental impacts. Based on the perceptions of respondents from 60 communities in East Kalimantan, the empirical results suggest that significantly more households received financial and in-kind benefits after decentralization compared to before. Many communities engaged in self-enforcement activities against firms both before and after decentralization, while a significantly higher proportion of households perceived community forest ownership in the post-decentralization period. The majority of households perceived no significant differences in environmental impacts. Finally, there is little evidence of a post-decentralization trade-off between environmental and financial contractual provisions.

 

Autores: Palmer, Charles / Engel, Stefanie